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heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
with the message on education, which i know you care about? >> i'm really excited about the next four years. there's a lot we can do in terms of encouraging kids and changing inner cities forever, really. by encouraging these kids to be entrepreneurs and scientists. that's where i'm putting all of my focus on. >> what else do you think his priorities should be in the next four years? if you have to choose a few, he can't go through everything he wants to do. >> jobs in america, you know, around consumer electronics. next year, consumer electronics will make $200 billion, and i would like to see those $200 billion, you know, a lot of that money here in america. >> do you think so many jobs from big companies are being outsourced at the moment? apples and company like that, they spend too much abroad? >> i think they spend pretty much everything abroad when it comes to manufacturing. we have to educate our kids and educate america. you know, so they have no excuse. the excuse is, the skillset isn't here in america. so if we get these american citizens and these kids a skill set, you know, hopefully
the internet revolution and applying it in more areas. so for example in education the idea that not only are the best lectures online but you can interact with people, talk to other students, that we ought to be able to deliver education that's higher quality but dramatically lower cost. there's a lot of excitement about that. massively online, open course ware, a lot of good pioneers that are learning and making that stuff better and better. the foundation is the biggest funder of that activity because we see so much promise and the increasing price of education just doesn't work. you know, a lot of unemployment is because kids aren't well educated enough. if you're college graduate, you know, unemployment is very low. so we've got to increase access to education but letting the price go up won't allow that. so it's often these applications of the digital technology are where you see the most impact even though it's all built off the fast chips and cheap storage and optic fiber and all the underlying platform. >> microsoft has not had an easy time recently. wow ever return to the ceo of
to have the children they want, to educate the children they had and keep them safe. so it really has to do with, how do we define women in our society? are they full and equal participants? and the best way, the seemingly sort of neutral way of undermining their personhood, is to focus on the issue of abortion. >> for us, our slogan is "health, dignity, and justice." and when you think about compulsory pregnancies, it's taking away health, dignity, and justice from a woman. many of the women, the latinas that we work with that have experienced abortion are in their 20s, have a child already, and are -- >> and why do they want an abortion? >> because they're not in an economic situation they -- >> they can't afford a second child? >> they perhaps can't afford a second child, they want to go to school, they might be at a point in their career. the reasons range, quite frankly. it's really important that women that we work with, mostly latina, immigrant, women of color, those at the margins, low income, are able to access their rights in a way without barriers and further bureaucratic o
to create the visa programs for skilled, highly educated workers to establish an agricultural worker program, and then establish a pathway to citizenship for those illegal immigrants who deserve the opportunity in their judgment. well, new york democrat senator chuck schumer calling the bipartisan blueprint a major breakthrough. he claims his fellow democrats are not looking to play politics with this plan. >> we do not want immigration as a wage issue. much rather we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. it is our hope that these principles can be turned into legislation by march and have a markup by chairman leahy with the goal of passage out of the senate by late spring or summer. lou: senator mccain bluntly acknowledged the republican party has been losing support of hispanic voters and says this agreement will change all that. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that in many issues which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, you will find that this agreement has very little difference from th
. there's personal-finance out of this over a period of years. our goal is to educate people for that great depression will never happen again. it's very much in the wake of its time. and i get that we can teach people certain skills. if they learn the skills we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like is on facebook. >> what's the best training for policeman? >> the best training you can get to become a really good police officer is to understand what it's all about. i will say that to the day i die. you learn to develop forces. you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships in a community at that is key. people in the 20 trust you, they will tell you when to our things that are happening that are not yet crimes. so that you can intervene. they will tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most of my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother t to the youngest polic
, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the continent. -- that is our presence on the continent. there are 100 personnel who are supporting africans in the effort to joseph kony and his senior lieutenants to justice. they are indicted by the international criminal court. there is a u.s. log that tells us to do that -- u.s. law that tells us to do that. if there is a law that tells us to do that, we go and do that. and it is important part of the consideration. as i mentioned, i have been to or need to of the different countries. -- i have been to 42 other different countrie
hutchinson will unveil his proposal and tonight in an effort to educate to think no one should own a firearm. we hit the gun range with a champion shooter to clear up misconceptions about guns and we'll go live and log on to our special companion site. >> it's "hannity" live. weigh in on the gun debate yourself. log on as the special audience edition of "hannity" continues. i paint people from my life mostly. my ex-girlfriend... 7th grade math teacher. who is this? that's pete. my... [ dennis' voice ] allstate agent. a "starving artist" has an allstate agent? he got me... [ dennis' voice ] the allstate value plan. it's their most affordable car insurance and you still get an agent. [ normal voice ] i call it... [ dennis' voice ] the protector. is that what you call it? the protector! okay. ♪ the allstate value plan. are you in good hands? >> welcome back to the special studio audience edition of "hannity." still ahead tonight we're going to the n.r.a. shooting range in virginia and clear up some of the widespread misconceptions about guns and show you some of the guns and shoot them for y
that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education. the sputnik launch in 1957. it may been to a younger generation to defuse because sputnik is probably not as -- as it is to the older generation but i was pretty clever. most of his slogans were not really caught on. the first summer he was in wishing to and he said, and it's a strange construct but he said in august this is the time when the shinki and becomes more -- and nobody knows what it means. somehow it's applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions that you want to talk about. yes, sir m.? >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the president's that we popularly think are so eloquent john f. kennedy. where they just good at regular words? >> john f. kennedy had some wonderful phrases and new frontier was his. but they were eloquent in their sensibility and the speeches. it wasn't that they created a term that was everlasting and some of them have interesting -- you would go to new frontier and go to term and. truman had costs are. he brought that bac
. education he simply said education, as if saying education or saying economy means prosperity, and education means knowledge. it doesn't. and the frustrating thing is, he's not leading on these issues. >> alisyn: as you said, unemployed today is 7.8%, the same as what it was when president obama took office, the real number, i don't have to tell you is much higher. people who are underemployed and they don't have this job in their career track. >> we'll put that number in some context. labor force participation the same as when he took office in 2009, that it's above 65%, that number would be-- well, be almost 10 1/2%. 10 1/2% and include those discouraged and left the workplace, the number rises to the 14.4%. >> alisyn: 14 1/2, right. lou dobbs we'll watch you on the fox business network. >> you have a deal. thanks, good to see you. >> alisyn: a growing scandal in ohio after investigation that the largest school district finds 53,000 final grades for students were changed from failing to passing. wait until you hear who is apparently behind this and why. and a terrified woman escapes a kidn
more short-term as well as more structural limits long-term like education and research. >> this is the issue that everyone is dealing with around the world. many nations, trying to figure out do you do austerity or do you invest in some of these very important areas such as education and is infrastructure? would you like to see more stimulus coming out of the ecb? >> i let the ecb decide on its monetary policy. i have read carefully the report and christine legarde's statements about the need to continue with accommodative monetary policy. to my mind, it's important that our policy mixes correct overall and it means that we need to continue with smart and prudent fiscal consolidation because it's so high, about 90% in europe. it is also a drag on growth. and at the same time, we have to ensure that the composition of consolidation is growth friendly so that we did not hamper elements like education, innovation and research. it's very important for future, medium and long-term economic growth. >> are there sectors in europe that you think will drive the growth more so th
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
that are the highest risk of poor health are those with poor resources, poor financial resources, poor educational resources, because they may not make good judgments or have access to health care when it's very essential, or when it's crucial in prevention of progression of an illness. david bennett: but for many people in the world, their demands in terms of health are mu more modest. the people who face hunger, who face the threat of disease constantly, for them, survival is really health. to see the very quiet, subtle way in which communities can pull together is really quite remarkable. if we have that very broad definition, then everything becomes health. if we look only at certain narrowly defined diseases, we miss somehow the whole interaction that makes up the human being. the whole interaction that makes up the health of a human being begins with a genetic map. dean hamer: dna is like a blueprint that determines not t only our physical bodie, but also, at least in part, our brains. and our brains, of course, are what control our behavior, and so, although it surprises some people, our ge
in a world where they're so closed to the changing social makeup of -- who is the educated work force in the united states anymore? mostly women, more and more diverse, and i you work at exxonmobil and go home to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work at exxonmobil and half your cousins and your brothers look at you in disdain or worry, that's not a wing strategy over 30 years. so something has to give, i think. i'm not sure they think that, though. >> host: that's one of my questions, too. is that it seems to me that kind of, we are who we are and take it or leave it, don't care what everybody else thinks about that -- has that backfired on them? seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste, and help make them, as you say in the book, public enemy number one at pointness their history. >> guest: yeah. well, it's a great question and a kind of complicated one. i think one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand as best i could and to think about what is it like to be so unpopular? does it matter? their default view, doesn't matter. just
is a fearless leader, answering the call to serve throughout his career. work on issues from education and transporation to civil rights and national service advanced the causes of the party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] now let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. marina alana, with your support today, serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive treasurer of the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service as president of the tier local 11 # reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. she'll strengthen the bond between the dnc and brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friends, congresswoman of hawaii, with your support today, will also serve as vice chair. she's the first american indue member of congress, and along with the congresswoman of illinois, one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [a
of you. and our goal is to educate people so that this great depression can never happen again. but it's very much in the wake oof the time an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills we will all be okay spent the dark set of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on after words on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like this on facebook. >> i think it's all an evolutionary process. you go into this role and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you're always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues you care about. you are never done. so there's never a point in time where you feel like, they are, i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. they changed is given the status issues of the country, and you never know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and fluid, and open to revolve. >> the first ladies, their private and public lives. c-span is teaming up with the white house historical association for a fi
states, you have to do education and you got to do treatment, because what we have is just a revolving circle of demand and we are not alone. europe is a huge demand, russia now increasing demand. cocaine routes and marijuana routes are not just coming up from colombia and other countries and latin america and the caribbean up to here, but going across the atlantic and going to other countries and comes from asia. it is pandemic. so i think we need a more comprehensive approach, one where it is less finger pointing and you work cooperatively to understand everybody's role in trying to do something about it. i have always felt that this label of war on drugs, is kind of artificial, because war implies is it's all out and you have to win. and i don't think it's all been out. and principally because we have failed to do our part in education, and abstinence. we have to engage ourselves and that would help establish credibility and viability with other countries. >> thank you very much for those answers. >> senator paul. >> senator kerry, thanks for coming today and your testimony. i agree
come with a dream of living a better life than their children. getting an education, working hard. in many cases starting up their businesses and living the american dream and we ought to find a way to make that more possible. now, that also means we live in a society of rules and so we need to abide by the laws that i think there are practical ways to abide by those lawses. and any ethnic where they come from, should live the american dreams and what it stands for. >> greta: what do you do about those illegally here in this country? have you thought about that? that's one of the thornier issues. >> well, clearly there's got to be a well thought-out process in doing this, a balance between respect for the law and all the talk about securing the border, which is important, is that we've got a mess when it comes to the federal agency that controls immigration. we've got people who want to come in and work hard and live the american dream. i don't care if they come from mexico, canada, europe, africa, they want to come here and add value, work hard and live the american dream. that's
is that my father taught me to value education. he was such a tirade about it. he often threatened to send it back to mexico if i didn't do well in school. >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: yes it was. i did not want to go back to mexico. i wanted to make him proud. i felt i owed him because he brought me here. i felt that i never wanted my father to say i should not have brought you. it always located me to do well in school and to do all these great things that he wanted me to do. and he never said that to me. as i was writing the book, really wanted to make sure that he didn't come across as the villain in the story. i really wanted to give him his humanity. there were a lot of great things about my dad. but he was also dealing with a lot of difficulties that unfortunately affected our relationship. >> host: you talked about them and go to church one sunday and he held up a budweiser beer and said, this is my god. when did he pass away? >> guest: he passed away last year. he died of liver cancer was diagnosed with cirrhosis and he kept drinking and never told us. he gave up dr
been doing anything? no. >> federal spending on things like investment, education, and infrastructure declines to the lowest levels in history. >> i hope you are right. >> why does the gao say we have to run sur produces starting today to have a sustainable government? the gao, obama's chosen auditors -- >> misreading it. the gao did not say we have to balance the report today. >> is stays the government is unsustainable unless we have surpluses now for what neil and i said. the interest payments on the debt bankrupt us. $3,000 now, $10,000 a person in ten years. can you afford to pay $7,000 a year? neil: i wish we could go more, but i'm not saying this to blast republicans. i'm not saying it to blast democrats. both parties have abused the privilege of lying. they gotten to the point now where they have nod addressed the underlying problem. i'm not interested in looking back at who is to blame. here's the mess now. fix it. we're not. all right. when we come back. blast your boss, but keep your job? how you can lash out, but stay in. i hope my staff is not watching. then, beyonce lip
environment. great education. dublin is a great city. they will build themselves out. they have done a great job coming back from the bailout. the way they're doing it is focusing on jobs, jobs, jobs. liz: you're one of some 20, not many firms who have been granted the ability to do trading on behalf of the federal reserve and behalf of the government. if they were to finally tighten rates, would that help your business a bit? i know it might hurt the commercial real estate business but, you know, rates at zero to 1/4% have killed certain segments of business out there. >> of course. i mean you have a two-year note at .2. what kind of rate is .2? that is not interest rate. you have a million dollar investment and u.s. treasury and buy coffee. liz: that changed under my sofa seats. >> what you're going to see when this $7 trillion of this liquidity, quantitative easing, that the federal government has thrown in, sloshing around causing these rates to be so, so, low, it really made u.s. treasurys a noninvestable good. it is a storage facility. it is not really an investment. what will happen,
father taught me to value education. he was such a tyrant and a threat in me to go back to mexico. it really was scary. i believe tim. i did not want to go back. i wanted to make him proud and because i a day than to break in one negative bring me i felt i owed him that i did not want him to say i should not have brought you. that is what motivated me to do well in school for the things that i wanted to do because i did not want to hear that ever. he never said that. he didn't but as i was writing the book i wanted to make sure he did not come across as the villain. i wanted to give him his humanity. he had great things, my dad. also dealing with a lot of difficulties that unfortunately affected our relationship. >>host: you talk about how you wanted to go to church one sunday and he held up the budweiser saying this is my god. >>guest: he died from liver cancer last year. he was diagnosed with cirrhosis in 1993 and never told us and kept drinking. he actually gave up drinking in the late nineties and became a very religious. a seventh-day adventist. but he never got himself to ac
, whether it's global health or whether it is education, we are doing things that are making a difference in people's lives with respect to those rights. i am absolutely committed -- usaid gets criticized and there have been some obvious problems with our contractor-aide relationships in the past. the committee i i think did superb work in putting a -- out a report with respect to that, but i think we can do more than we are doing today. >> i appreciate that. we had -- you just had the discussion with senator risch on russia, we have seen some slippage since the breakup of the cold war ending, you mentioned secretary kissinger's comments in 1994, the complexity of this arrangement. we have seen slippage. we have seen slippage in russia with their human rights tensions. there's been slippage among our allies in france, what's happened in hungary with recent elections in the government changing, trying to change the constitutional protections. slippage in the ukraine with imprisoning their opposition. our roolingsshep -- relationship where other countries can be ma thure enough where we can
measures to allow more americans to travel freely. relatives to travel for religious, cultural, educational purposes. i think that's a good thing. i hope that you'll find a way to continue that and to continue more innovative approaches to deal with change their akaka with regard to the united nations for a minute that p.a. was granted unesco in 2011 and then again in 2012. full membership by the general assembly that and many of ours is an impediment to the investigations that have to happen. the general assembly is have a habit of doing this over the years and decades remember in the 70's the designated the plo as a representative to really spent time in southern africa. they had designated one of the parties as the sole and authentic representative of the people, and that did nothing but delay meaningful negotiations between the parties that need it to happen. from your position at the state department, to what measures would be take to ensure that our position, the congress's position is to deny funding to some of these u.n. organs if such reference is made. i know there is some wiggle
the age of 21. and it is growing. if they did not find jobs, if they deny get educated, if we do not do something, all of us at the end of the developed world, including china, russia, south korea, brazil, mexico, those developed countries that have the capacity will have to come together and about this. everybody is affected. i think that is a challenge for all of us. that is my response to a very big question that is a legitimate questions. we ought to sit down and work on this over the days ahead. >> thank you, mr. chairman. senator kerry tom hines thrilled to be here -- senator kerry, i am in built to be here. i cannot think of anyone better to continue the efforts of the current administration. thank you for being willing to take on this task. that may well in your family -- let me welcome your family. let me just say i look forward to casting level -- casting my vote in support of u.s. secretary of state and the also join the in defending the red sox and the patriots. >> finally. thank you. >> i want to echo the concern about continuing to support an agenda that urges equal rights
schooling. but again, school isn't just about educating kids academically. it's about educating them to be social beings. being able to communicate with others and develop independently with their friends and peers. you want to have a good relationship with your kids. don't get me wrong, i love them. but the reality is we have to set them free at some point. >> steve: i have think you both agree on ha. >> absolutely. >> steve: all right. we thank you both for joining us live. what do you think about that? e-mail us. how is the economy doing? just ask borns and nobel. it's announcing a major shut down. then, would you hire these guys, male models, moonlighting as handymen? we're going to talk to them coming up. good morning, fellows music: "make someone happy" music: "make someone happy" ♪it's so important to make meone happy.♪.♪it's so e ♪make just one heart to heart you - you sing to♪ ♪one smile that cheers you ♪one face that lights when it nears you.♪ ♪and you will be happy too. i obsessed about my weight my whole life. i figured i was just born that way. i was al
, meaning she worked, she worked to support us, to give us a home, to educate us, and obviously that's not neglect or abandonment in the legal way that you're talking about, but she and i worked through my feelings. >> you write about everything. that's interesting, there are details on virtually everything and when you reference the peace you made with your mother but really don't walk us through. >> because everybody thinks it happened in a moment, that one day, some sort of light bulb went off and we had this one conversation that summarized the repair. it wasn't like that. most people would like a magic pill that will fix every problem there is. it doesn't work that way. >> you say you wrote this book so you could remember who you are. >> i wanted to hold onto what i thought was the best in me, and if you ask me the next question, logical question, which is what is that? >> what is that? >> i would tell you it is sonia who cares about family and friends, the sonia who loves the law, who believes in its nobility, and the passionate sonia who believes that the best thing you can do
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)

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